Starting Piano Again

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Question: Hello, I am new to this site, but like what I’ve seen. A little background about myself: I am a 48-year-old old female. I took piano lessons from age 7 to age 14 or 15. I don’t mean to speak ill of anyone, but the teacher I had at the time was probably not the best. My mom could not afford much but wanted to give me the exposure, for which I am very thankful. Since then “Life” happened, school and family took priority. About 6 years ago I was in a very serious car accident, which took many years of rehabilitation. I still have some problems, but I count my blessing daily and realize how fortunate I am. I still currently work full time. Now to my current question.

About two years ago I started to reacquaint myself with the piano. I wanted to start at the beginning, realizing there was a lot I didn’t know. I bought books and I mean books. Different grade levels, different approaches, different authors, theory books, technique books, scale books, lesson books, classical music books, movie tune music books, all-in-one adult lesson books. As you can see, I went somewhat overboard in trying to get going again. Things were going okay, trying to refresh the knowledge that I did have, but after awhile I started to get frustrated. I know I have too much stuff to sift through, which has left me feeling very unorganized and lost as to where to go from here. Could you help me with an approach as to how to move forward or get me organized or point me in the right direction? I would appreciate any advice or ideas you could give me. Thank you.

– Tamara (Bakersfield, California, USA)

Albert’s reply: This sounds exactly like my attempts to learn French! I’m well aware of this situation in learning piano as well, so I decided that my method needs to address this common challenge. I’m therefore developing a piano course that integrates lessons on repertoire, music theory, reading music, ear training and technique in a step-by-step yet simultaneously flexible environment that continually introduces and reinforces musical concepts.

The best advice I can give you right now is to find and work regularly with the best teacher you can. You’ll need someone to show you specifically how to practice, what to work on and how to improve, as well as to measure your progress. If you don’t find a suitable teacher locally, I offer online piano lessons via Skype, which have been very successful.

You can definitely use the music you’ve collected in the many books you purchased. Find music you like at your current level and a skilled teacher will be able to explain many details relevant to your playing. In short, you need a teacher to guide you.

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