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D Minor Chord piano chord chart

The D minor triad, more commonly called the D minor chord, is a minor triad consisting of the notes D, F and A. Here it is on the treble clef staff:

… and on the piano:

Here is the D minor chord on the bass clef staff:

As a minor triad, the D minor chord consists of a minor third...

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Toastmaster Magazine Cover Story

I’m humbled and overwhelmed to get to share some wonderful news with you. Toastmaster Magazine’s editorial staff unanimously chose me for a major cover story for its monthly print edition in over 140 countries!

For nearly a century, Toastmasters International has been the...

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Key Signatures theory

Key signatures are designed to simplify music notation by indicating the key. Without them, composers would be forced to write accidentals (sharps and flats) every time they’re used, which would greatly complicate reading music.

Because each key signature indicates two keys (one major and...

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Chord Inversions theory

Chord inversions are “spellings” of a chord with a note other than the fundamental in the bass. Let’s take a simple example:

The C major triad consists of the notes C, E and G, in that order:

As long as the C is on the bottom, the chord is in root position. Both the above...

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Circle of Fifths theory

The Circle of Fifths depicts all key signatures in order of increasing sharps and flats:

It’s a very easy way to learn the key signatures by depicting them graphically. With C major at the 12 o’clock position, the Circle of Fifths starts with zero sharps or flats, also called ...

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Bach's Musical Signature theory

Question: How do I calculate Bach’s musical signature?

– Alfi M.

Albert’s reply: Bach often wrote his name in musical notation, sometimes hiding it in his works. In German, the note B-flat is called B, and B natural is called H. Thus, B-A-C-H in German is played B-flat, A, C,...

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Bach's Ornaments theory

Question: Great Web Site!

I am studying the Bach B Minor Invention BWV 786. In the Explication, the manner of execution of the trill is very clear, and yet one can find conflicting interpretations in the recordings and in edited manuscripts.

It seems that most performers allow themselves...

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Common Chord Progressions theory

This lesson will introduce you to the most common chord progressions, so widely used that they can be found in virtually every piece of tonal music regardless of genre or era. Astonishingly, the following chord progressions are used as frequently in Renaissance and Baroque music of centuries past...

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Difference Between Motives and Phrases theory

Question: Hi Albert,

Would you be so kind as to help me get clear on the meaning of “motive”? Also can you differentiate a “motive” from a “phrase”? I want to follow your instructions for the proper way to practice but I’m confused on these two terms....

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Difference Between Pitches and Notes theory

Question: What are the two pitches in music called?

Albert’s reply: There aren’t just two pitches in music, there are as many pitches as there are colors.

Yet pitches aren’t the same as notes. A given note can be tuned to a different pitch. This means that it can be adjusted...

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Distinguishing Minor from Major theory

Question: How can I distinguish minor from major pitches?

Albert’s reply: Major and minor aren’t properties of single notes or pitches but rather of groups of notes. Major and minor can refer to keys, scales, chords and intervals. Let’s look at them in turn.

Keys and Scales

...

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Fugue Analysis theory

Question: I’m starting to learn Bach’s Fugue in D major from Book 1 of the Well-Tempered Clavier. I’ve read your extremely useful article, How to Learn a Fugue, and I have started to practice the fugue accordingly.

My question is related to the structure of the fugue (of this...

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